New Vancouver Art Gallery site, West Georgia Street, Vancouver, BC 2016

January 30, 2016 | Filed Under Architecture, Art, Arts, BC Photography Archive, British Columbia, British Columbia Photographic Archive, Canada, Canadian, Cascadia, Documentary Photography, Don Denton, Fine Art, Historical, History, Landscape, Pacific Northwest, Photography, Street photography, Travel, Urban, Vancouver, Vancouver Street Photography | Leave a Comment 

New Vancouver Art Gallery site, West Georgia Street, Vancouver,

As an exercise I sometimes try and photograph with an eye to preserving a view that will not exist in the future. The above is one such view. Shot from  Cambie Street and looking across Georgia Street to the north. The parking lot seen at the lower right of the image is the future site of the Vancouver Art Gallery. That new building will most certainly obscure the existing view that includes the iconic Sun tower with the  blue/green dome roof on Pender Street. The Sun tower was at one time home to the Vancouver Sun newspaper, hence the name. When it was built in 1912 it was the tallest building in the British Empire. The new art gallery will have a unique wood exterior and  the VAG site says work will commence in 2017.



Grave Site of Albert “Ginger” Goodwin, Cumberland, BC 2011

December 8, 2015 | Filed Under Albert Ginger Goodwin, BC Photography Archive, British Columbia, British Columbia Photographic Archive, Canada, Canadian, Cascadia, Coal, Documentary Photography, Ginger Goodwin, Historical, History, Labour, Landscape, Pacific Northwest, Photography, Road Trip, Union, Vancouver Island | Leave a Comment 

Grave Site of Ginger Goodwin, Cumberland, BC 2011

Even today, coal miner, union activist and conscientious objector during World War I,  Albert ‘Ginger’ Goodwin remains a controversial figure in British Columbia history. The native of Yorkshire, England came to Canada to work in the coal mines and later became involved in union activities in response to terrible working conditions. He ended up becoming the vice-president of the British Columbia Federation of Labour as well as a union president. Initially found unfit for military duty due to black lung, after leading a major strike at the Trail, BC smelter in 1917, his status was revoked and he was ordered to report for duty. A pacifist who was opposed to the war, Goodwin took to the hills around Cumberland where he remained safe until July 1918 when he was shot and killed by a police officer. The event was controversial with the officer pleading self defence and others suggesting it was murder. Goodwin’s funeral procession apparently stretched for a mile and his death is supposed to have led to the Vancouver General Strike in August 1918, a major event in Canadian labour history.

As mentioned Goodwin still provokes conflicting emotions in the province.  Part of the highway nearby was named Ginger Goodwin Way in the 1990′s by the NDP (labour friendly) government but in 2001, after an election brought in the big business provincial Liberals, the Goodwin signs were removed.

Grave Site of Ginger Goodwin, Cumberland, BC 2011 2



Architecture and Landscape Changes Vancouver Island 2015

November 21, 2015 | Filed Under Architecture, Art, BC Photography Archive, British Columbia, British Columbia Photographic Archive, Canada, Canadian, Cascadia, Documentary Photography, Don Denton, Fine Art, Historical, History, Ideas, Pacific Northwest, Personal Project, Photography, Photos, Road Trip, Street photography, Vancouver Island, Victoria | Leave a Comment 

Beach Avenue House 1

 

Beach Avenue House 2Two photographs taken a week apart. In the first a heritage house, sporting some unique architectural detail, sits on supports and a trailer, in the second, the vacant lot after the house was removed and view of the previously hidden seascape. The third, yet to be taken, will show the new structure built on the lot. Change is inevitable and at least in this case the original structure will be placed on another lot and continue it’s architectural life.

CBC British Columbia has a story about a new book out called Vancouver Vanishes which ‘laments the demolition of character homes and the histories they contain..’ The book grew out of the photos and essays contributed to the Vancouver Vanishes Facebook page.



Local Bands Live, Victoria, BC 2015

October 9, 2015 | Filed Under BC Photography Archive, British Columbia, British Columbia Photographic Archive, Canada, Canadian, Documentary Photography, History, Music, Music Archive, Pacific Northwest, Photographers, Photography, Punk Rock, Vancouver Island, Victoria | 2 Comments 

Recently I’ve managed to get out and photograph a few local bands playing live, something that at the beginning of my career I did a lot. It’s still fun and there’s nothing like a live performance in a small venue. I’d never photographed any of the three bands, pictured below, before and they were photographed on different nights. What I found most interesting was how the bands shared members.

The first band I photographed was Line Traps, I went to see them as I knew their guitarist Tiemen Kuipers.

Line Traps 1

The second band was 12 Gauge Facial  (love that name) as I’d met the vocalist Yasuko Thanh (who is also a novelist) at the Line Traps gig. The Line Traps’ drummer was also 12 Gauge Facial’s drummer.

12 Gauge Facial 1

The final band was Hank Angel and his Island Devils. Hank is the bassist for 12 Gauge Facial but I didn’t realize that the guitarist from 12 Gauge was also in Hank’s band.

Hank Angel and the Island Devils 1

 

 

Some people follow their history through their cultural interests, movies, books and music.



Parksville Beach Resort, Parksville, British Columbia 2015

August 18, 2015 | Filed Under BC Photography Archive, British Columbia, British Columbia Photographic Archive, Canada, Canadian, Cascadia, Documentary Photography, Don Denton, Landscape, Pacific Northwest, Personal Project, Photographers, Photography, Street photography, Vancouver Island | Leave a Comment 

Parksville Beach Resort, Parksville, British Columbia 2015

The beaches were crowded during a recent visit to Parksville on Vancouver Island. Crowds were watching and participating in a big interprovincial beach volleyball tournament and lots of people were taking in the sandcastle sculpture competition. Then there was the Parksville Beach Resort, all boarded up, just above the beach and crowds and next to new towers of other hotels. I don’t know the history of the resort but it seems strange to see this dilapidated holiday destination among all the other action.



BC Transit Bus And Metal Scrap Yard 2015

August 12, 2015 | Filed Under Art, Arts, BC Photography Archive, Blog, British Columbia, British Columbia Photographic Archive, Canada, Canadian, Cascadia, Documentary Photography, Don Denton, Landscape, Pacific Northwest, Personal Project, Photography, Photojournalism, Photos, Street photography, Urban, Vancouver Island, Victoria | Leave a Comment 

BC Transit Bus at Metal Scrap yard 2015

A BC Transit bus lies at the bottom of a heap of scrap metal waiting to be torn apart and added to the pile in Victoria, British Columbia. The business sits on Victoria’s waterfront just on the edge of the city core. The city has voiced support for keeping industry on the waterfront but one wonders how long a recycling plant will stay (be allowed to stay) on shoreline property with amazing views..



BC Almanac – 1970s Vancouver Photography

October 15, 2013 | Filed Under Art, Arts, BC Photography Archive, British Columbia, British Columbia Photographic Archive, Canada, Canadian, Cascadia, Documentary Photography, Fine Art, Pacific Northwest, Photo Book, Photography, Photos, Publishing, Vancouver | Leave a Comment 

The BC Almanac, a 1970 publication of images by Vancouver photographers

The BC Almanac, a 1970 publication of images by Vancouver photographers

I finally found a copy of the 1970 publication BC Almanac, a library copy. Quite unique for the time, it consists of 15 booklets printed on newsprint and inserted into a cardboard folder. On the negative side, this copy only has nine of the booklets. On the positive side the booklets by Roy Kiyooka and N. E. Thing Co. (Iain and Ingrid Baxter) are in the package. The Kiyooka and NE Thing images hold up very well (two booklets at right) but some of the other photographs look very much of their time. In this day and age where self publishing is a given and quite simple to do it is an eye opener to see this ambitious and inventive project from a time when publishing was much more of a challenge and effort .



Olympic Peninsula Weekend Road Trip

January 17, 2012 | Filed Under Blog, Cascadia, Documentary Photography, Don Denton, Historical, History, Landscape, Olympic Peninsula, Pacific Northwest, Personal Project, Photography, Road Trip, Street photography | Leave a Comment 

Hit the road for a weekend with a trip around the Olympic Peninsula. I’d been down the east side before travelling to and from Portland but hadn’t done the whole loop around the peninsula. Great trip although the weather was constantly changing, providing a number of challenges for driving and making it difficult to get all the photos I wanted. That said it was a lot of fun and I saw lots of places that I want to go back to.



Mike Andrew McLean – Thirty-Five thousand Forty at Open Space

November 15, 2011 | Filed Under Exhibition | Leave a Comment 

An eye and mind boggling exhibit by Mike Andrew  McLean at the Open Space gallery in Victoria. Here’s the intro from the gallery’s web page:

Thirty-Five Thousand Forty
Mike Andrew McLean
November 10 to December 10, 2011
Opening November 10 at 7:30 p.m.

Thirty-Five Thousand Forty is the physical culmination of Mike Andrew McLean’s project to shoot ninety-six photographs a day for three hundred and sixty-five consecutive days. McLean’s year of photos, now printed as 4”x6” snapshots, will tile the interior of Open Space, forming a sprawling record of the artist’s life from June 2010 to June 2011.

McLean writes “photography in the digital era is developing its own language, forging unique processes and technologies. It seems to have reached the democratic potential that George Eastman predicted one hundred years ago, when he took the process out of the studio of the trained craftsman and put it into the hands of the unskilled hobbyist.” McLean turns the idea of digital photography inside out, conferring an analogue physicality and monumentality onto a format that proliferates effortlessly, flooding websites, Facebook, memory cards and hard drives in an unimaginably deep cloak of images.

———————

Note the final photo posted here. Dan Milnor snaps a photo of a 2G hard drive mounted on the gallery wall. All the photos in the show are stored on that one drive.



Don Denton and T. J. Watt Exhibition Opening at Dales Gallery

November 14, 2011 | Filed Under Exhibition | 1 Comment 

Here’s a few images from the opening last week of  the joint photo exhibition for T. J. Watt and myself called Seeing The Forest For The Trees at Dales Gallery in Victoria’s Chinatown. The show, See The Forest For The Trees, runs until November 25.



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